Results tagged “Interviews” from one management blog

LIL' ONE -- KIARA RIDGELL


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E-meet Kiara Ridgell, One's 20-year-old new face from Monticello, Arkansas.

 

Instagram: @kiaradanaye

Twitter: @kiaradanaye

Facebook: Kiara Danay'e

 

Modeling story. I met [scout] Scie Ward two summers ago at her open call. She took me on and helped me get started.

Favorite designer. Jason Wu, don't ask why, but I feel like if I were to meet him we would be best friends. I also love John Galliano.

Any given day of the week, I'm wearing... Simple black tank-top, fitted black jeans, over-sized cardigan, black leather bag and black suede booties.

Beauty routine. I am a natural girl. Just water and face wash. Oh, and I use Raw Shea Butter. It keeps my skin smooth and bright.

I'm currently listening to..."What Can't We Do," by Cris Cab feat. Daytona. Calvin Harris is my favorite DJ. And he's hot too.

My browser is always open to... Models.com and Style.com. I pretty much live there.

Last book you read. I'm reading Tim Gunn's Fashion Bible: The Fascinating History of Everything in Your Closet.

Little known fact. Most people don't know that I'm a HOOPER. I love, love, love basketball. I've crossed a few people and jayed. [Ed. Note: jayed, in case you were unsure, as most of us in the office were, is when you make a mid-range shot over another player]

I Heart NY. I've been in NYC since last January. All the different people and cultures in one big city amuses me. It's so different.

Favorite NYC restaurant. Spice on 13th and Broadway.

Biggest "Holy Shit, I'm a model moment." The day I signed with ONE. I love being a part of the family.

Favorite Spring/Summer show this season. DKNY.

Photographer you'd give a leg to work with. Steven Meisel. He can make any girl look like a supermodel.







The Love Magazine by Sante D'orazio














ONE LOVE : MIGUEL REVIERGO


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 Christopher Michael: Your first camera was bought for you at age 8, my initial thought was what signs could you have possibly shown at such a young age for your parents to have bought you a camera but something tells me that it was more likely you who came out and asked for one, am I right? What sort of mental process occurred in your mind as a young boy that brought you to wanting a camera?
Miguel Reveriego: I did ask. It was my first communion, in Spain you turn 8 and they dress you like a priest. Since I was very young I have been obsessed with pictures and models. I still remember those Revlon ads with all the big girls, the supermodels. I was very into the movies as well - so I didn't really know if I was asking for the right camera or just more something to look through. I wanted to look through my own new world, my own movie. I was quite shy when I was little and I had to find my own way of surviving that moment and that's what happened. It was pure infatuation to be honest, with pictures of models... I'm not sure if I was so conscious at that age of what I wanted to be or if I was just trying to be those personalities, just having a camera for me was that instrument 'they had' that I wanted to have, because I wanted to be like the movie directors or the photographers more than being self conscious at 8 of what I wanted to do. It was more of a fascination with the whole spectrum of personalities and energy they created.

 

CM: Well said... Amidst the surge of relevant new names in fashion today, your name comes along with a noticeable brand... 9 times out of 10 I'll recognize your work before reading the credits, whereas I think that some of your contemporaries although very talented, may be a tad more 'in the process' of developing their trademarks still... How did yours come to be developed? Or is it more so the way you've always made your images from the beginning?
MR: I think at the very beginning I didn't really know where I wanted to go. I thought that the only way to do something personal was to be true to myself and follow my gut instincts.... I always take the photograph that I like, it is the woman that I like, the hair that I like, the type of energy that I like, just because it's what I like. I explored that world, rather than trying to do different things or having a brand... its actually letting myself go. My agent Camilla told me in the very beginning, just do what you do, follow your roots, follow your passion and follow what you've been surrounded by your whole life and it made sense because it was really easy for me to just do what I was... Kind of natural, not contrived.

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 CM: It's said to be the secret of success, only by being different are we able to be indispensable. Camilla gives good advice! During a period that can only be explained as 'cross generational' both photographers and editors are having a chance to work with their heroes so to speak and the now iconic generations seem to be enjoying the dabbling into of the new community kids... Is there any particular editor or stylist that you would love to work with and have not just yet?
MR: There are a few of them, if I had to say just one, I would love to be on set with Grace Coddington. You know what I appreciate, I've worked with very few but very particular editors in my career. I chose to do it that way because I thought that it was very important rather than just doing fashion pictures, doing something that was more of a collaboration and working with people whose point of view I really respected, rather than just working with anyone. When you look at her work, you always see it goes beyond the dress, beyond the lip, it goes beyond everything, it is a "whole". Like the editors I'm working with now, they go beyond the outfit, they are actually interested in creating an image and they spend their days thinking about and working on it and they follow the process from beginning to end. Even when you finish on set they keep going with you and I think that is really great when you collaborate with people. I have not had the pleasure of meeting Grace yet but when you view her work it seems that this is the way she works as well, and it's amazing..

 

CM: Indeed, she's a personal favorite of mine as well... London, the eternal magnet for creative minds also nabbed you early on in your development... how was it that you started working with Mert & Marcus at that time?
MR: That was the reason I went to London. I was in Madrid, already assisting fashion photographers. I followed the magazine The Face a little bit but it wasn't really my time...but then POP magazine came out, I still remember not as much of the first cover they did but the second cover with Solve and Lucas, this Argentinean guy, I still remember exactly the black background and yellow logo. Then M&M became the stars in POP, it sounds really silly but I used to literally take the magazine and "lick" every one of M&M's pictures because they were so amazing. They used to shoot in Metro Studios so I said to myself "I'm going to go there and ask for a job, I would love to work with them". It was very difficult because I obviously didn't speak fluent English but after trying several times, going there over and over again, I got the job. I met their first assistant at the moment and through her, I got an interview with them. At that time they have just bought their house in Ibiza and they were looking for someone who could speak Spanish and it happened. It was amazing, an incredible experience... the whole thing. If I were to attribute anything to that period, it would be how clear the concept of the woman was, I really discovered that it was about a woman, it wasn't about a shoe.. it was about a shoe on a woman, it was a dress on a woman, it was hair on a woman, and it was a particular woman that was wearing those clothes.. and I think that inspired that whole brand that you mentioned before.. because they used to always shoot the same style of woman, it didn't matter if she was in couture or a pair of sneakers...it was always like that, every shoot with them was so inspiring that there were moments where you were holding the light and you couldn't even react to what they were asking because you were in this kind of trance and couldn't believe that that was happening..

CM: Recently you've been added to the growing list of new additions to the Bazaar US roster, the magazine has an incredible history of collaborations from the Warhol illustrated days, to Avedon & Lindbergh etc... Do you think that there is definitely a new wave going on at the house of American Harper's as well or do you see it as a natural turn over / update that perhaps has occurred since the magazine's conception?
MR: I would like to think that is the organic way, it has to be normal at some point. There are absolutely amazing photographers out there who have been doing amazing images for 30 years and it¹s great that they are still there and have longevity in inspiring the world with their work. But at the same time I think that there are a lot of new talent that have a lot to say, that also have a lot of ideas to express in a very complicated moment in the industry. I am finding it very refreshing as Harper's is one of the biggest magazines in the world with a super talented team, from Glenda to Zoe and all the Photo Team, they all really want to do something... they fight for what they believe in. It is more challenging to shoot for a magazine with a bigger audience than if you were pitching a creative idea to a more independent magazine like a Dazed or an i-D.

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 CM: You are not the first person to mention the Photo Dept over there, they often get referred to in the way you just have which is a rare occurrence, I find in general at publications they are usually very behind the scenes..this team must be quite incredible... In the days where Fashion is under constant scrutiny for its negative effects on the self image of people both young and old, its positive influences are something that clearly need to be acknowledged as well, and I think that magazines are doing a great job with it and bringing more attention to the Models who are involved in various charities and such... Is there any particular world cause that has your attention right now?
MR: This is a personal subject. I do appreciate these girls doing it and talking about it because they are very much a group of public figures, and it is so important that they do bring awareness to these issues. Most of these girls, of the names you've mentioned, are some of the most inspiring women I've met in my life, Eva.. or Bridget.. For instance when I met Bridget Hall, I was scared I was going to meet the myth and be demystified by what they are in person, but it ended up being a very special moment and someone really inspiring. These girls are so strong and have been around so many things and so many situations that for them to go up there and be like 'look we also can do this, and we are also interested in helping people' and it's not all about the shoe and the clothes... it shows they are humanitarian.

 

CM: You've been on your own and done with assisting for about 4 years now and you are in quite a pretty place in the scheme of things... Do you think it's all happened quite quickly or does it feel like it's been years that you've been at it by now?
MR: It felt natural, I did everything when I was ready to do it, I learned from my mistakes. Sometimes life can spin too fast especially in our industry and I think it gets to a point where you have to be honest with yourself for the process to be natural. I love my work and it is a great part of my life. I am enjoying my journey.

CM: Some photographers go to the shows, others just stock them on style.com.. Some pay little to no attention... How interested do you find yourself in the runway action during the chaos of fashion week?
MR: I normally do as many shows as I can and go to Paris during fashion week for the shows and also to see a lot of friends and people from all over the world. I love going to shows for many reasons, you see what will happen the following season, new girls, old girls, how everyone is doing and what shape they are in. I also think a fashion photographer has to be involved and aware of what's going on in fashion. I chose to work in fashion so I enjoy the energy of the shows, the new collections, it is a kind of theatre... You can send me a link of a girl and the shows she did, but it's when I see her performing that I realise her potential, the way she carries herself, the way she walks, the little cheeky face, it's kind of amazing. As long as I can I will keep doing it, it's super inspiring to see the girls in action... they are all buzzing and you can see the buzz also behind the scenes and backstage. That intensity, every single person of the industry is so alive and the adrenaline is pumping...

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ONE LOVE : MARIE CHAIX


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Q: I'm not sure if I'm wrong in this fact find but it seems as though you finished up at St Martins and went straight into working at Self Service, how does one lock down such a stellar start in the business?

A: I was looking for an internship after school, I always loved the magazine. I think that was the first place I called and they told me to come in....a week after I was there working and I didn't leave..


Q: Off to a nice start you were..... After 5 years at the magazine you seemed to have undergone a sort of Big Bang theory and your works were suddenly amongst the pages of numerous publications from i-D, Another Magazine to Russian Vogue Covers, Vogue Paris stories etc...what brought on the sudden expansion?

A: I think it happend sort of naturally in a way. I mean, I became freelance and I worked for Mixte for about 6 months, and then I started working for English magazines like i-D and Another, while still working for Self service, as well as various Vogue publications. The more you do it, the more you learn, and sort of experiment in different areas, doing something that is more independent and more free creatively and more polished. To do different magazines like this helps you also to explore different sides of what you do.

 

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Q: Definitely. As you know, the Modeling world can be a fierce jungle and in some cases even, girls decide that the fame and glory is not worth the gruesome travel schedule and endless competition the business brings forth...how would you explain it from the stylist side? Is the world equally ferocious amongst the climb that occurs in the career of an editor as well?

A: It's competitive, and I guess the more you do it maybe the more competitive it gets, but every industry is competitive in a way. Especially now with the economy I hear it has become more competitive, but I don't know. I just try, like everyone else, to do the best you can and to have fun with it as well. That's why you did it in the first place, but the more you do it the more you sometimes forget why you do it in the first place, so I think it's important to remind yourself of why you started doing it to begin with and not be too completely serious. Of course, you want to try and always push things, to bring out a certain quality in your work, pay attention to detail, but there are always going to be things you can't control! And that's what makes a great picture too, that special moment.

 

Q: Right now there is an incredibly unprecedented moment occurring in our business where the range of generations all working in tandem is far more diverse than before, and the new up & comers are getting the chance to share the platform with their idol's who are now considered living legends...what do you think made this new found era come about?

A: It's true actually. I didn't think about it before, but now that you mention it, it's true.... I think maybe it is because the industry grew and it's much bigger than it was before. There are many more magazines than there were before, so there are more pages as well. I guess it opens people's minds a little bit. I think after awhile you want to try something new and work with someone new because I guess they can bring something, and they (the idols and living legends) also bring you something very valuable-experience. When you are new, you maybe have some kind of fearlessness in your creative decisions. I think that perhaps it seems fresh for those who've been around longer to work with, and they bring you their experience, with the incredible body of work they produced..it is interesting...

 

Q: I personally love it, it's not just a range that is happening with the photographers and editors but also with the Models as well which has been great. Up until now the 2000's seem to remain unbranded by any particular fashion revolution, what has the first 10 years of the new millennium represented in fashion for you?

A: I was in high school and the beginning of college during the 90's and I was always wondering what that decade would be remembered by, and now it's 2010 and you look at something and say 'oh well that's so 2000, you sort of picture the excess or the logos or all these kind of things, but there were great moments and amazing pictures. It's maybe a bit too soon to look back on?

 

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Q: Excess, that works...The Tale on how Anna Wintour met the boys of Proenza is a funny one, what is the story behind your collaboration with them and how that whole thing come to be?

A: I think we just met and it kind of clicked really well, which is interesting because they are American and I'm French, but they do work with quite a lot of French people. I think it's a good mix, and feels quite organic in the way that it works, the dialogue and the dynamic... you have to get to know each other's taste and interests. Working with designers involves everything. It's not only research, its conversations and bouncing ideas. I don't know if the right word is organic, but that's how I feel like explaining it...and we are also from the same generation, which is great.

 

Q: Speaking of Generations, you yourself are a part of a generation fast in the coming, in a few short years at this rate Marie Chaix will be a staple name in the world of fashion, seeming as though you were always a part of it. However, with you being you I think that its rather difficult to see the picture the same as it is from the outside..What does it look like from your standpoint being inside the picture?

A: It's very different. You don't really realize these things because you're just in your mind and you just continue working, preparing the next shoot so you sort of lose track of actually where you stand. It's only when other people tell you but you're always the last one to know...you know what i mean?

 

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Q: Indeed, however I think that your standpoint is an admirable one, not being too quick to look back on your accomplishments...You mentioned earlier that there are a lot of magazine's right now and that there has been this kind of major growth in the business, the points of view on this matter vary..where do you stand? Do you think it's a good thing or no...

A: I think it's a good thing that people want to do things and have the energy to start something. I always kind of admire people who just get on and do something and they believe in it. I think if that portrays a certain kind of positivity then it's a good thing when the magazine has a different point of view, a strong identity, which is very important. People always talk about saturation of images and it is true but I think that somehow the internet adding on to it accentuates that even more. If people want to do a magazine it's great-it's a lot of work and a lot of responsibility, and I think that if people want to do that, yeah, it's a positive thing. We also need the magazines for new generations to express themselves, you need a voice and a magazine provides a voice. I love Acne paper, for example you know Matthias, and also Thomas, whom I know from St Martins, so they're people who share this kind of aesthetic and sensibility, and we can have a conversation on the same level as well, which is always good when you want to do something creative like that-it feels like we are part of the same generation which is nice.







ONE LOVE : MARIANO VIVANCO


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Christopher Michael: Peruvian, hot blooded, forever smiling and filled with excitement...this is Mariano Vivanco to me. Cinematic, vivacious, erotic, sharp, ethereal and bold is his work. How would you explain these two sides of the one that makes up all that is You?

Mariano Vivanco: LOL, oh my God that is quite an introduction. Thank you! Well I think you summed me up quite well! Yes, my outer self is happy and positive and inside my head there are lots of images, ideas and moods floating around. I get ideas from absolutely everything and everywhere. It might sound cliche, but I am a like a sponge. My creative process comes through instinct.

 

CM: I find that Film is an increasingly popular medium amongst today's working fashion photographers, and also something that you've been playing with for some time now. One of my favorites of yours of course is the Bridget Hall JEM Story accompanied by the HOLE soundtrack, all too good! Do you have any plans of which we are not yet aware for this film work of yours moving forward?

MV: It was so much fun to work with Bridget, so professional and sweet. Yeah, I bought a movie camera about 4 years ago, and again I had this huge intuition to get one. I just thought, heck I am doing this catalogue with all my favorite male models (David Gandy, Clark, Sam Way....) I need more than just pictures, I need moving images. It all made sense to me shortly after that, it's the natural evolution of our business, the moving image... People today are just not satisfied (in my opinion) with a still image (although to capture "The decisive moment" will always be a huge skill and will never go away). The moving image feeds the hunger of the younger, quicker and smarter generation. I have been working at perfecting my skills with the moving image, and every shoot I do (film crew wise) keeps getting larger and larger! I really love it, an important client of mine just hired me for their campaign and also for a TV commercial for them, so I am really happy about this.

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CM: Congratulations, that's quite a speedy progress... Dazed, as it has with so many other talents, has played a wonderful role in your career..how did this relationship come about?

MV: I was in London for a couple of years, and I had a look at all the magazines that where about. Dazed really stood out. It was really cool, street and interesting. A friend introduced me to them, and I begun working for them. Simple as that. Since then I have worked with all the main contributing editors for the magazine, I love Dazed and Jefferson, he has been hugely supportive of me. Also, before them, no other magazine had given me that trust. Which other magazine would have let me do a story based on the 80's cartoon Jem!? In that story, Bridget Hall played the lead character, while Kylie Bax and Anne V played the Misfits...LOL...I still laugh (fondly) when I think of that! That was 2 years ago now. Each girl did a video. It was so much fun, and it taught me to not to take yourself (or your work) too seriously!

 

CM: Agreed, if you can't laugh at yourself you are dead anyway right? Your work with boys & girls is quite different for the most part..I find that you shoot men from an extremely sensual and pure point of view..evoking thoughts of idealistic beauty and raw eroticism along the way. Whereas your images of Women tend to empower, inspire and be shot from a point of view of great strength and confidence. Leaving men as the passive and women as the dominant almost...Am I hallucinating this perception or do you find this to ring true in your work?
MV: Again, that is a great observation, and you are right. I guess with men I just watch and with women I relate. Sometimes they cross over; my women can be very sensual and sexual, and my men can also be from a fashion point of view.

CM: Despite your obvious obsession with the fashion side of fashion, you also have quite the interest in Celebrity...in our field we always talk about what a model has that a Celebrity may not when working on set for a shoot. Lets turn the tables, what do you find Celebrities bring to the set when working for a magazine that perhaps you don't always get from a Model? If there is something...

MV: I have to be clear with something, I love and respect celebrities, but they will never be models. Our models are like our characters in fashion, our "actors". On the whole, the celebrity thing has kind of pushed them back a bit. But I am sure they will swing to the foreground sometime soon. What do celebrities bring to the equation? They are usually very driven and interesting people who have lived full lives and have had to utilize their intellect and intelligence to get where they are, not just their looks. They usually have big characters and are very self aware, and thus, make great pictures very quickly. They have a different energy. To me when I shoot a celebrity it's a challenge. I usually have to break them down in one way or another to make my pictures work. I recently shot Megan Fox for the cover of Wonderland and I have to say, not only was she much more than beautiful, she was.... Amazing! I had a great time working with her!!

 

CM: At this point in your career, how much is decided by your agent and how much is up to you in regards to whether or not you shoot for a new publication?

MV: It is always a talk we have together. I would love to shoot for everybody everyday, but I simply can't. Photo shoots are usually costly for one, and also the relationship with a magazine is a considered thing.

 

CM: You've already done many times over what some photographer's take a lifetimes work to finally produce, and that is put out Books of your work... As this is something that personally interests me I'm quite curious to find out how this came about for you, and what creative process was demanded of you in the making of these books...

MV: The first 5 books where direct commissions, actually. For my first book, "Calcio" for Dolce Gabbana, Domenico Dolce said, "You have 21 days to complete this book: shoot, print, retouch and layout" I took the challenge, did not sleep, did not eat and lost my sanity for at bit.... I was shooting in as many as 3 different cities around Europe, in ONE day! Honestly, to this day I have never done anything like that, but it taught me many lessons. One in particular: to listen to my instincts to get the shot.

My latest book "Ninety Five Chapel Market" (the actual address where I first lived in London) is a collection of all the model portfolios I did when I first arrived in London. I worked for Select, Storm, Next, Models 1 and many more. This is how I started in London. Sienna Miller, Lily Cole, David Gandy, Anna J, Jamie Dornan and many more, all passed by my apartment first. The photos and polaroids were just sitting in a box, and I would take them out from time to time to have a look. Nicki Bidder (the then Editor in Chief of Dazed and Confused) suggested that I do another gallery showing, and I thought maybe those photos would be good. I was gonna do a small fanzine type of book, but it grew. To answer your question, as a photographer you always have this incredible urge to have the world see your work and maybe, feel what you feel. I think it is really important to give something back and I donated all the proceeds of the book to the children's ward of The Barts and London Hospital.

 

CM: Charity, another incredible concept, Bravo. I think everyone with a voice in fashion should be involved in at least one Charity...After using a number of different mediums in your creative works to date, the world is left wondering...what shall we see next from Mr Vivanco??

MV: LOL, who knows. I am having a great time with all that I am doing and I am very grateful for that, so let's see!!!

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ONE ICONOGRAPHY - HELENA VS. PETER


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Helena Christensen: Most of your fashion shoots tell little magical stories. Do you ever dream these stories?

Peter Lindbergh: Nothing comes from dreaming. My dreams, if I ever remember them, are so complex, that I wouldn't try to turn them into a story for a fashion magazine. There are too many rules you have to follow. Just the fact, that every new picture needs a different outfit, will make a lot of ideas impossible. I think you can use your Dreams to create images, when you don't have the limitations of Fashion photography, and you work for yourself or your gallery.

HC: My favorite story that I ever did was the one we did together for Italian Vogue with the little alien. Where did this particular idea for the story come from?

PL: The idea to shoot this story was born in my dentists waiting room in Paris. Someone left a small pile of tacked together Xeroxes on the table, with images and notes from UFO watchers all over the world. One of them was Mr. Kienzle, close by the El Mirage Dry Lake. I was fascinated by these images, mostly just reflections on the Sky, I guess and decided to do a Martian Story. That was exactly when you passed by my studio for the first time to show your pictures. I was stunned.....by you!! The perfect new face for the story just walked into my studio! The only thing left was to Write a Story, with a beginning and an end, and fly to L.A to shoot it.

HC: You have a way of photographing women that make them seem like strong, fierce and independent women. Is this important for you to convey about women to the viewer?

PL: To define and to propose a very personal view on Women, has always been very important for me. I think that this is the most important and exciting part of fashion photography. When you look back, every Decade has defined a certain type of women, basically through the work of one or two photographers not to mention the work of designers, editors, hair and make up etc. During each decade, there is a lot of experimenting going on, by many photographers. To come back to your question, only these photographers who had the sensibility "to put the pieces together", to define the women who represents a certain decade, are the ones we still know.

HC: What kind of light do you prefer working in?

PL: Every light has its own beauty....

HC: Mention 3 contemporary artists you would like to exchange your art with for theirs..

PL: Michael Heizer, Gerhard Richter, Joseph Kosuth.

HC: What has been your favorite location over time to photograph in and why?

PL: My favorite locations to work, you should know, are the deserts and dry lakes, large and unromantic beaches, movie studios backlots, and down town Los Angeles. I like any place which adds something interesting to a Story I have on my mind...

HC: Why do you think photography is such an interesting art-form?

PL: I wouldn't say that photography is an especially interesting Art form. It is just one out of many, and by accident the one I fell into and stuck with, because I can express myself perfectly with these little black machines...

HC: What is the most amazing visual or moment you have ever seen that you didn't photograph?

PL: When I was twenty, My mother looked into my eyes for quite a moment, she was dying...







ONE LOVE - Alastair Mckimm


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CM: Born in Belfast, started your journey into Fashion in London...when you enrolled at Nottingham Art School for your BA in Fashion design, had you originally intended on being a designer? Or was it more of a General kind of 'I am interested in fashion and have not yet decided what within this realm I want to do just yet' sort of decision..

AM: I DEFINITELY INTENDED ON BEING A DESIGNER. AT THAT POINT I DIDN'T KNOW WHAT A STYLIST WAS. I HAD ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN PHOTOGRAPHY AND WAS PLANNING ON GOING TO PHOTOGRAPHY SCHOOL UNTIL RIGHT BEFORE I APPLIED TO COLLEGE. FASHION DESIGN WAS A RELATIVELY LAST MINUTE DECISSION. THE DAY I FOUND OUT ABOUT STYLING I KNEW THAT WAS WHAT I WANTED TO DO.

CM: As it seems to work with publications, there are both times where you as a stylist are approached to work on a story by a photographer, as well as those times where it is you who has been commissioned by the magazine and deciding on which Photographer you'd like to work with...how do you make such a decision when searching out for the right lenser on a particular story?

AM: I DON'T ACTUALLY WORK WITH MANY PHOTOGRAPHERS SO THE DECISION IS USUALLY RELATIVELY EASY. I LIKE TO WORK WITH PEOPLE I TRUST AND CAN COMMUNICATE WITH, PEOPLE WHO'S OPINION I RESPECT. THAT BEING SAID, I'M ALSO LOOKING FORWARD TO COLLABORATING WITH SOME NEW PHOTOGRAPHERS THIS SEASON.

CM: As always, rumors are abuzz and there is one which sparked my interest.. is it true that you are soon to become the new Fashion Director for "The Last Magazine" ?

AM: YES - IT'S VERY EXCITING! I'VE WORKED WITH MAGNUS (BERGER) AND TENZIN (WILD) ON THE LAST TWO ISSUES OF THEIR MAGAZINE AND THEY RECENTLY ASKED ME TO TAKE THE POSITION. THE MAGAZINE IS REALLY BEAUTIFUL AND IT'S IMPORTANT TO HAVE SOMETHING FRESH IN NEW YORK. OBVIOUSLY I'M REALLY LOOKING FORWARD TO BRINGING IN SOME GREAT STYLISTS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS OF OUR GENERATION. THAT'S WHAT THE MAGAZINE IS ALL ABOUT.

CM: Over the Years Glenda Bailey has maintained her reputation of selling magazines at quite impressive Numbers, and as of late the magazine seems to have sparked up an extra edge that goes somewhat beyond their previous creative boundaries...that new roster of talent now includes you which needless to say evokes an element of excitement for the rest of us.  What are the major differences you've experienced when working on a story for Harper's Vs. say an i-D or Jap Vogue etc. ?

AM: I LOVE GLENDA'S KNOWLEDGE AND ENTHUSIASM AND REALLY APPRECIATE HER WILLINGNESS TO LET ME WORK AT THE MAGAZINE. SO FAR I LOVE IT, THEY ARE A WELL OILED MACHINE AND HAVE THE BEST TEAM WORKING IN THE FASHION DEPARTMENT, WHICH MAKES MY LIFE MUCH EASIER.
WHEN WORKING ON i-D I FEEL MOST AT HOME, MAINLY BECAUSE i-D IS THE REASON I GOT INTO STYLING. I STARTED ASSISTING EDWARD (ENNINFUL) WHEN I WAS 21 AND HAD JUST MOVED TO LONDON. I HAD NO CLUE WHAT I WAS DOING BUT LUCKILY HE GAVE ME A CHANCE. I EXPERIENCED SO MUCH - FROM i-D TO ITALIAN VOGUE TO JIL SANDER SHOWS, IT WAS AMAZING. ALTHOUGH I DO HAVE TO ADMIT I WAS A TERRIBLE ASSISTANT, WHICH I'M SURE HE'D VERIFY!

CM: I always feel like after awhile, it's possible to get a feel for what someone's 'taste' is..(doesn't always mean the feeling is right) but when watching your work it seems as though your casting is based more on the particular story than perhaps a certain type of girl that is the general constant in your casting.  Would you say that's true? Or do you feel that there is very much an 'Alastair type girl' ?

AM: I LOVE CASTING, FOR ME IT'S AS IMPORTANT AS THE CLOTHES IN MANY CASES AND A VERY IMPORTANT PART OF MY JOB. THIS SEASON MOST OF MY SHOOTS HAVE BEEN CASTING STORIES, MAINLY NEW FACES. THERE WERE SO MANY GREAT NEW GIRLS THIS SEASON IT WAS NICE TO WORK WITH A LOT OF THEM. IT'S OBVIOUSLY IMPORTANT FOR THE GIRL AND THE IDEA TO GEL BUT I DO HAVE MY FAVOURITES.

CM: On every level for everyone involved, working on shows is a much different experience than shooting a story for a magazine...on the level of the stylist, what are your preferences on each side over the other in comparison...?

AM: I LOVE BOTH. THEY ARE VERY DIFFERENT SKILL SETS BUT I ENJOY A DAY IN A DESIGNERS STUDIO AS MUCH AS A DAY IN A PHOTO STUDIO. I DEFINITELY THINK MY DESIGN SCHOOL BACKGROUND HAS HELPED ME UNDERSTAND WHAT IS POSSIBLE WHEN WE'RE WORKING ON COLLECTIONS.

CM: If you were to use one word to explain the general feel of each markets fashion week, what words would you choose to define the shows for New York, Paris, Milan and London?

AM: HOME, WINE, COFFEE, FRIENDS

CM: It seems that over the last few years, there has been an influx of new, young and cool designers like Rad Hourani, Alexander Wang, Proenza Schouler as well as Rodarte popping up in the New York Shows...do you think the American Fashion is headed towards a shift from the household brands that have defined our show season for so long (outside of Marc Jacobs of course) into a mix that includes more of a street chic nation?

AM: THERE'S A GREAT ENERGY IN NEW YORK AT THE MOMENT. I'M EXCITED TO BE LIVING HERE AND TO HAVE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO WORK WITH ALEX (WANG) AND THE BRILLIANT TEAM AT OHNE TITEL, ALEXA (ADAMS) AND FLORA (GILL). THEY'VE BEEN NOMINATED FOR THE CFDA AWARD THIS YEAR, SO WE'RE LOOKING FORWARD TO THE SHOW! I THINK AWARDS SUCH AS THE CFDA AND THE EDUCATION AND UNDERSTANDING OF THE FASHION BUSINESS IN NEW YORK HAS A LOT TO DO WITH THIS NEW GENERATION. THERE HAS DEFINITELY BEEN A SHIFT BUT THE ADVERTISING DOLLAR STILL OUTWEIGHS THE TALENT IN MANY WAYS.























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